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Environmental Engineering Research 2007;12(4): 129-135. DOI: https://doi.org/10.4491/eer.2007.12.4.129
EVALUATION OF MICROBIAL RISK IN SOIL AMENDED WITH ORGANIC FERTILIZERS FROM STABILIZED SWINE MANURE WASTE
Il Han1,3, Young Shin Lee2, and Joonhong Park3
1Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Korea Military Academy, Nowon-Gu, Gongneung-Dong PO Box 77, Seoul, 139-799 Korea
2Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanseu University, Daegok Ri 360, Haemi-Myun, Seosan-Si, Chungcheongnam-Do, 356-706 Korea
3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, 120-749 Korea
Corresponding Author: Joonhong Park ,Tel: +82-02-2123-5798, Fax: +82-02-312-5798, Email: parkj@yonsei.ac.kr
Received: July 9, 2007;  Accepted: August 10, 2007.
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ABSTRACT
This study evaluated microbial risk that could develop within soil microbial communities after amended with organic fertilizers from stabilized swine manure waste. For this purpose, we assessed the occurrences and competitiveness of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity in soil microbial communities that were amended with swine manure wastes stabilized by a traditional lagoon fermentation process and an autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion process, respectively. According to laboratory cultivation detection analysis, soil applications of the stabilized organic fertilizers resulted in increases in absolute abundances of antibiotic resistant bacteria and of two tested pathogenic bacteria indicators. The increase in occurrences might be due to the overall growth of microbial communities by the supplement of nutrients from the fertilizers. Meanwhile, the soil applications were found to reduce competitiveness for various types of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the soil microbial communities, as indicated by the decrease in relative abundances (of total viable heterotrophic bacteria). However, competitiveness of pathogens in response to the fertilization was pathogens-specific, since the relative abundance of Staphylococcus was decreased by the soil applications, while the relative abundance of Salmonella was increased. Further testes revealed that no MAR (multiple antibiotic resistance) occurrence was detected among cultivated pathogen colonies. These findings suggest that microbial risk in the soil amended with the fertilizers may not be critical to public health. However, because of the increased occurrences of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity resulted from the overall microbial growth by the nutrient supply from the fertilizers, potential microbial risk could not be completely ruled out in the organic-fertilized soil samples.
Keywords: Antibiotic resistant bacteria | Autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion | Lagoon fermentation | Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) | Pathogen
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